TPB #6 – Motion Sensor

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This episode shows how to use a motion/distance sensor with the Camera Axe.

The sensor used is a LV-MaxSonar-EZ1 (datasheet). This sensor not only detection motion, but will give back a distance from the sensor. It measures distances from 0 to 21 ft and take about 20 readings per second. 20 Hz is more than fast enough for wildlife. Check out the data sheet for more detailed information.

I show how ...

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TPB #5 – High Speed Flash Sync

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This episode explain how a flash synchronizes with your camera in high speed sync mode. It would be a good idea to watch TPB #2 along with this episode to understand how shutter lag works.

When not using high speed sync the maximum shutter speed you can use is limited by the time it takes your camera to open your shutter. I measured this to be 4 ms on a Canon 30d. ...

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TPB #4 – Sound Trigger

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This episode show how to setup and use the microphone sensor with the Camera Axe to make a sound trigger.

The main components you need are the Camera Axe, microphone sensor, and a flash cable.

The use cases are bullets, shattering glass, popping balloons, and just about any other high speed event that makes noise.

Credits

Photos by Maurice Ribble
Music by Dan-O

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TPB #3 – Laser Trigger Photography

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This episode show how to setup and use a laser trigger with the Camera Axe.

The main components you need are the Camera Axe, light sensor, laser sensor, camera cable, and a flash cable.

The use cases are for things like pet photography, security, wildlife photography, high speed photography, and much more.

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TPB #2 – Shutter Lag

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Hello, this is Maurice and I welcome you Tech Photo Blog. This is episode #2.

This episode measures the lag introduced by the Camera Axe.  Then I measure the actual shutter lag on a Canon 30D using two different methods.  The first involves using a front curtain flash and the second records a video of the shutter opening.   The reasons for the long shutter delay of 69 ms is broken down into ...

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